David Lynch: Suburban Anxiety And Unease

Alfred Hitchcock (1899–1990) was the master of suspense. His quirky sensibility spearheaded 60 films, looked upon even today as blueprints of suspense and horror. What is overlooked, in today’s carbon copy, uninspired product called horror and suspense, Hitchcock was the King of Intellectual Suspense. He never catered to the lowest common denominator. Hitchcock challenged his audience to pay attention. Playing heavily on the psychological, opposed to the physical, aspect of being terrified, http://www.bestchoicetv.com/, the director focused on being isolated. Such films as 1943’s Lifeboat, set entirely on a lifeboat; Rear Window (1954), played from the point of view of a crippled man; and expansive films like 1959’s innovative North by Northwest, finds a character alone in horrendous situations.Check out this link here. His films utilize the director’s fixation with being separated and threatened, even in Norman Bates. This character, though the antagonist, epitomizes being scared, alone and in hiding. Even more than his films, Hitchcock’s television show was definitely a palette of the insecurities, frailties and common fears we don’t want in our dreams, let alone our lives. Hitchcock was brilliant at creeping under the skin. Even when making us laugh, we cringed. He has left an unparalleled legacy of dream and psychological horror.

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July 4th, 2013 at 12:00amadmin

David Lynch: The Master Of The Surreal

David Lynch first stunned critics and audiences alike with his 1977 horror classic, ‘Eraserhead.’ The black and white film utilizes surreal effects to create a living nightmare for the characters and the viewers. Since ‘Eraserhead,’ David Lynch has made his name as the father of the surreal.

David Lynch’s acclaimed directorial and screenplay work includes films such as ‘Blue Velvet,’ ‘Mulholland Drive,’ and ‘Inland Empire.’ His biopic, ‘The Elephant Man,’ was nominated for eight Oscars and won three BAFTA awards.

In addition to his film career, David Lynch created (more…)

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May 7th, 2013 at 12:00amadmin

What Makes A Good Horror Movie?

Logically, a good horror movie would probably be something that scares you or horrifies you.

However, there is a difference between the kind of stuff that makes you jump in your seat (like Jason bashing through a window with a machete) and the stuff that scares you long after the film has finished. The former is what many people refer to as a cheap scare, something you can shrug off, and lacks the essence of what true horror is all about.

It’s not about a carefully time music cue or sound effect to make you jump in your seat for 5 seconds; real horror is about the long-term effect. A good horror movie manages to crawl in through your eyes and ears and occupy your mind for days or even weeks afterwards.

Real horror is about atmosphere and mood creating an immersive nightmare experience that you simply can’t escape from. And sure, if you get your TV service through http://www.directspecialtv.com and you get all those movie channels, you’ll have access to lots and lots of horror films. However, they will be less about the experience and more about fleeting moments.

No, if you want real horror, I would suggest you start in the 70s and 80s. The Hills Have Eyes, The Exorcist – the list goes on.

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January 20th, 2013 at 12:00amadmin

What Is The Point of All The Horror Remakes?

While there are new horror movies popping up fairly often, remakes of movies keep showing up right along side of them. One is given to wonder…why is that?

There are several possibilities, one of the most likely of which is the fact that these movies used to make money. It might seem negative to simply say “money,” but the movie business IS a business. The logic behind rehashing the same old ideas might come from the saying, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” These movies used to be extremely popular and they are often (more…)

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July 5th, 2012 at 12:00amadmin

1970s Grindhouse, Rape And Revenge Films

The 1970′s is considered the best era for Grindhouse, rape and revenge films. These films had reached the apex of their popularity, and were coming out in droves. The films were increasingly violent and crude, which is what excited audiences the most.

“Vanishing Point” is one of the most famous Grindhouse films of its time. Released in 1971, this film would remain forever iconic with it’s white Dodge Challenger chase scenes.

” Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song” was the first Blaxploitation film, released to a swarm of controversy in 1971. This was the first film to blend Grindhouse aesthetics with (more…)

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June 21st, 2012 at 12:00amadmin

Could Ingmar Bergman Be Considered A Horror Master?

Ingmar Bergman was a Swedish film writer, director and producer, with over 60 films credited to his name. Known for his contributions to European Art Cinema, Bergman isn’t the type of director that typically comes to mind when one thinks of horror films. However, as an aesthetically innovative filmmaker, some of his best films employ the usage of horrific images in an effort to convey his “art cinema” visions.

One such work is Bergman’s complex and experimental 1966 film, “Persona.” The movie begins with an assortment of disturbing images, including those of a (more…)

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June 19th, 2012 at 12:00amwww.tobehooper.com

Slasher Films: Did The 1980s Ruin Horror Films?

The 1980s definitely changed the horror genre in regards to movies. The most popular slasher films were Halloween, Friday the 13th and Nightmare on Elm Street. You can look at those three movies as a broad genre, but that’s a common mistake. If you really look at these three films, they’re different from one another.

Out of those three movies, or movie franchises, Halloween is the most impressive. It holds a deep story that takes (more…)

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June 17th, 2012 at 12:00amwww.tobehooper.com

Alfred Hitchcock’s Studies In Dream And Psychological Horror

Alfred Hitchcock (1899-1990) was the master of suspense. His quirky sensibility spearheaded 60 films, looked upon even today as blueprints of suspense and horror.

What is overlooked, in today’s carbon copy, uninspired product called horror and suspense, Hitchcock was the King of Intellectual Suspense. He never catered to the lowest common denominator. Hitchcock challenged his audience to pay attention.

Playing heavily on the psychological, opposed to the physical, aspect of being terrified, the director focused on being isolated. Such films as 1943′ (more…)

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June 16th, 2012 at 12:00amwww.tobehooper.com


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